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INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY (IAEA) TECHNICAL COOPERATION STRATEGY
Name

Administrator

Date

2011.07.07

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3566

 
Outline of Presentation
Background of IAEA
Technical Cooperation
Programme
Strategy
The East Asia and the Pacific Programme
Model Project Criteria
IAEA : STATUTE
The underlying basis for the IAEA's work is to facilitate the peaceful development of nuclear energy. Its Statute entered into force in 1957 and sets the framework for technical co-operation activities:

“The Agency shall seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world. It shall ensure, so far as it is able, that assistance provided by it or at its request or under its supervision or control is not used in such a way as to further any military purpose.”
IAEA : Background


135 Member States

35 Member Governing Board

46 years of international service

2,234 Professional and support staff

IAEA : Financial Resources
$ 210,5 million regular budget for 2002 in addition extra-budgetary contributions received amounting to $42,4 million for 2002
$ 57,5 million for 2002 in voluntary contributions paid to the Agency’s Technical Co-operation Fund
Technical Co-operation Fund (TCF)
Voluntary contribution by member States:
Targets established by Member States
Pledge
Payments
Rate of Attainment

Assessed programme costs =8% of TC delivered
Miscellaneous income
Extra-budgetary fund :
From Members States
UNDP
Cost sharing

 

THE DEPARTMENT OF TECHNICAL COOPERATION (TC)
Mission: Management of Technical Cooperation for Development
Objective: To contribute to tangible social and economic benefits and scientific advancement in member states
Administrative Budget: (2002-03) $29.4 million
TC Programme - Quick Facts
New obligations: US $74,6 million in 2002
Programmes: National, Regional, Inter-regional
Agency has national TC programmes in approximately 100 countries
2/3rds of these are non-nuclear power countries
25 recipient countries participating in the TCP are LDCs
Regional programmes: Regional Agreements (4) and non-Agreement regional
TC Department has approx. 200 staff
Major Field of Areas of the TC Programme in 2002
Safety (nuclear installations,
radiation safety, nuclear waste) 24%
Human Health 19%
Food & Agriculture 14%
Industrial Applications 9%
Nuclear Science 7%
Water Resources Management 6%
Nuclear Power 4%
The IAEA’s TC programme: Trends
The use of nuclear technologies in developing countries is growing as local infrastructures improve and technology transfer increases.
Interest is increasing among both donors and recipients in technologies that help respond to and accelerate the achievement of development goals (e.g. relieving hunger, improving health care, providing access to safe drinking water).
Some countries and institutions are becoming more self reliant as viable markets develop for nuclear technologies, based on an increased awareness of their benefits.
THE IAEA’S TC PROGRAMME: CHALLENGES
To convince donor and recipient governments that nuclear applications and consequently, TC projects are an effective and safe means of addressing important economic and social problems.
TC: MANDATE FROM THE BOARD
To ensure that TC assistance is based on the most cost-effective nuclear technologies/techniques
To ensure sustainability and impact of the assistance provided
In short, to apply the MODEL PROJECT discipline to the entire TC programme
TC STRATEGY
Following the Board’s mandate, TC has developed the strategy with the main objective of ensuring that its limited resources are spent only where the IAEA work can be most beneficial and cost- effective, with measurable and sustainable impact, for solving high priority development problems
The strategy also aims at improving the design and delivery of the TC programme and assumes a more pro-active role for TC programmers as opposed to the past
TC STRATEGY: OBJECTIVES
The main aims of the 1997 Technical Co-operation Strategy were to ensure: a demand driven approach to technical co-operation; the relevance of TC projects to development priorities; and improved project quality.

The 2002 review confirmed the original Strategic Goal:

to increasingly promote tangible socio-economic impact by contributing directly in a cost-effective manner to the achievement of the major sustainable development priorities of each country.

TC STRATEGY: CURRENT STATUS
endorsed by the Board in December 1997
milestones came due at the end of 2000
report card presented to TACC Dec. 2000
2002 review of the achievements
new milestones established to end 2005 (GOV/INF/2002/8/Mod.1)
TC STRATEGY: DIRECTIONS
Strengthen self-reliance and sustainability of counterpart organizations
Build partnerships with development organizations
Focus technology on the roots of Poverty
Result-based ? tangible benefits for targeted population groups
Compete in the technology marketplace.
TC STRATEGY: ELEMENTS
Model Project
CPF
Thematic Plans
Partnerships
Co-funding
Sustainability
TCDC
THE MODEL PROJECT CONCEPT THE MEANS OF ACHIEVING THE TC GOAL
Model Project Concept was the most important of the three mechanisms IAEA uses to implement the strategic goal for technical cooperation.
It provides the framework for moving from institution based projects to beneficiary based projects that serve targeted end-users.
The end-user - in IAEA terminology - is the last link in the chain that connects technology with the problem holder. Reaching the end-user is the underlying objective for all Model Projects and the key concept underlying the TC Strategy.
THE MODEL PROJECT CRITERIA
respond to a real need;
reflect an indispensable role for the nuclear technology involved;
produce significant economic or social impact; and
have demonstrated potential for sustainability through strong Government commitment.
The Model Project approach is now implemented in all TC Activities, while sustainability through Government commitment has become the guiding “Central Criterion”
THE CENTRAL CRITERION

A project meets the central criterion if it addresses an area of defined need in which there is a national programme enjoying strong government commitment and support.

Such project take two forms:
those that produce a tangible socio-economic benefit in an area in which nuclear technology holds a comparative advantage;
those that clearly support an enabling environment for the use of nuclear technologies(such as safety infrastructure or energy planning).

COUNTRY PROGRAMME FRAMEWORK (CPF)
Improves the project selection process by placing it in the context of national priorities. CPFs help national authorities to identify the problems to be addressed with nuclear technologies and visualize the results expected in a given time frame. CPFs are the principal means of implementing the central criterion. A key to the success of CPFs is for governments to take ownership of the process.
Country Programme Frameworks (CPF)
Aim: to achieve agreement between the Agency and the Government to focus on a limited number of priority
areas for the TC Programme in the coming years.

Experience has shown that the CPF process is at least as important as the product
THEMATIC PLANNING
Thematic planning is a process by which specific problems are identified for which the transfer of nuclear technology through technical co-operation can be expected to result in significant impact, because of the distinct advantages of the nuclear technology involved.. Selected technical themes should be given greater emphasis, as appropriate, by publicizing success stories, informing Member State governments on actual or potential benefits, conducting studies, and seeking to identify potential partners.
Thematic Planning
Identification of best practices, key stakeholders/partners in a thematic area;
Comparative assessment of nuclear techniques with conventional techniques - clarifying the Agency’s role;
Identification of key countries for programmes using a given technology;
Mapping the way forward: CRPs, TCP
PARTNERSHIPS
a)Financial: partnerships between the Agency and large donor organizations;
b)Strategic: partnerships raise the profile of nuclear science in development. Raising the profile of the Agency’s TC programme is not an end in itself; rather, in the effort to attract partners, it promotes awareness of the nuclear technologies available and, significantly, of tangible benefits from their application;
c)Technical: technical partnerships achieve synergy by combining complementary nuclear and non-nuclear technologies.
PRINCIPLES OF FUNDING
IAEA is not a funding organization.
Project fund raising is at least a joint activity between the Agency and Member States, and at best a concerted government objective.
The Technical Co-operation Fund is too small to realize social-economic impact in most Member States. TCF must be used to demonstrate the tangible benefits of applications that attract major funding (seed money).
Funding is competitive: the best projects attract the most money.
FUNDING
In part, new funding for technical co-operation should come through partnerships with non-traditional donors. New funding also comes from recipient Member States that are prepared to share project costs, because of the tangible benefits that accrue to them through Agency assistance.
CO-FUNDING
Other agencies are not automatically aware of IAEA projects
TC is actively working to acquaint other agencies both in general and in terms of specific projects
Much of this process of informing and educating can best be done at the country level
CO-FUNDING
Using support from two or more sources
The IAEA has projects that work and produce useful results if carried through to the end user
Applications through the right end user can involve experiences beyond the means of the IAEA
- E.g. taking the results of mutation breeding programme through field tests and national agricultural extension programme to farmers
SUSTAINABILITY OF BENEFITS
National ownership of TC programmes;
Careful selection, and;
Leveraging of Agency resources.

All help to ensure the long term viability of country programmes.
However, the ultimate factor in sustainability is the degree to which countries and individual institutions can achieve technical and financial self-reliance.
ASSISTING COUNTRIES AND INSTITUTIONS TOWARDS SELF RELIANCE
At the institutional level, this role includes encouraging management to develop “markets” or “customers” for their products and services;
At the national level, it means encouraging Member States to enhance strategic planning for the nuclear sector, to solidify their support for areas in which nuclear technologies can best serve national priorities.
At the regional level, it involves encouraging Member States to work collectively towards rationalizing services and products so that individual institutions can remain viable.
Self-Reliance
Agency assists countries and institutions that are ready to move towards self-reliance.
TCP strengthens capacity of institutions in Member States using nuclear technologies to become more technically and financially self-reliant.
This will ensure sustainability.
OWNERSHIP AND SUSTAINABILITY
Regional Cooperation Mechanisms.
Field management structure where leadership, planning, organization and control of projects coming from member states.
Strong regional base for expert services and host institutions.
Formal agreements with regional institutions to “outsource” implementation activities.
Strong technical inter-dependence among scientific institutions and common ownership of technology packages such as Tissue Banking.
Regional Cooperation Mechanisms
Regional Cooperation Agreement (RCA) for East Asia and the Pacific
African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology among African Member States (AFRA).
Regional Cooperation Agreement for the Promotion of Nuclear Science and Technology in Latin Americana the Caribbean. (ARCAL).
Regional intergovernmental agreements provide opportunities for cooperation among IAEA counterpart organization. The IAEA acts as Technical Secretariat.
TECHNICAL COOPERATION AMONG DEVELOPING COUNTRIES (TCDC)
Many developing Member States have strong technical capabilities in nuclear technology and its applications.
The experience of succeeding in difficult circumstances may be of more value than that of a developed country
TCDC will often be less expensive
TCDC
Contributing sustainable delivery of services to target beneficiaries by end-users after completion of Agency TC Projects.
Sharing of resources and skills
Use of Regional Centers (RRU, RRC)


TECHNICAL COOPERATION PROGRAMME
The East Asia and the Pacific Region

Financial Resources (Hardcore)

Programmes Regional RCA Regional Total National Total Ease Asia Total % Share of
Regional of Total
1993 851,250 851,250 7,421,100 8,272,350 10
1994 1,222,600 1,222,600 8,926,950 10,149,550 12
1995 432,200 1,632,800 1,632,800 7,118,340 8,751,140 19
1996 321,700 1,653,600 1,653,600 7,183,608 8,837,208 19
1997 197,940 2,315,700 2,315,700 6,871,853 9,187,553 25
1998 1,211,975 3,740,342 3,740,342 8,139,209 11,879,551 31
1999 2,103,205 4,830,085 4,830,085 8,197,480 13,027,565 37
2000 2,153,710 5,152,585 5,152,585 6,153,720 11,306,305 46
2001 2,500,940 4,951,410 4,951,410 7,906,266 12,857,676 39
2002 2,560,650 4,912,310 4,912,310 7,191,235 12,103,545 41
2003 2,720,972 5,656,360 5,656,360 7,360,704 13,017,064 43
2004 2,521,432 5,705,784 5,705784 7,312,043 13,017,827 44
2003-2004 TC Programme
2003 TC Programme Hardcore
Total Programme for 2003 (as of 31 January 2003)
RCA Programme ? Financial Resources (Hardcore)
As of 31 January 2003
MS Participation in National and Regional Projects
Projects with future year budget commitment
CO: Projects with budget already indicated in the 2003-2004 TCP

CI: Projects designed in 2003-2004 TCP for 2005-2006 and beyond, but no budget figures for 2005-2006 are given

CII: Projects with no component beyond 2004 TCP but strongly expected to be extended or continue in
2005-2006

The Region Future Year Commitments
Distribution of 2005-2006 TCF Commitments
RCA Programme with Future Year Commitments(Hardcore)
Distribution 2003 by Budget and Field
Country Programme Framework (CPF) - Status

Summary
Financial Resources are limited
Member States and Secretariat have to cooperate to implement activities included in project workplans
> 45 % of 2005-2006 budget have been committed
Less than half of the East Asia and the Pacific Region TCP recipients have finalized and signed a CPF document
BASIC IN THE PREPARATION OF PROJECT PROPOSALS TO MEET TC STRATEGY OBJECTIVES
To consider Central Criterion to obtain sustainable benefits within the framework of national and regional development plans
To consider strategic partnerships to gain recognition as a partner for the cost effective transfer of nuclear technologies that contribute to the resolution of development problems.
To consider diverse possibilities of funding to solve development problems
To search for sustainability by strengthening the capacity of institutions in Member States using nuclear technologies to become more technically and financially self-reliant